Tuesday 25 January 2022

Löfbergs’ new report says sustainable development is crucial for our existence

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KARLSTAD, Sweden – The financial year of 2020-2021 was characterised by challenges and new ways of working – and a strong belief in the future. Increased support for small-scale coffee farmers, more certified coffee, lower climate impact, and continuous investments in a circular transformation were some of the progress. That is what the new sustainability report from Löfbergs Group shows.

“Sustainability is the most important matter of our time. A sustainable development is crucial for Löfbergs to keep existing as a business, as for all companies. The latest IPCC report is clear. We need to act now and the business community plays an essential role. Since its start in 1906, Löfbergs has taken much responsibility for the community, people and the environment, and we will be a leading player that work towards a sustainable development in the future as well,” says Anders Fredriksson, CEO at Löfbergs Group.

Löfbergs’ sustainability report 2020/2021 in short:

  • 100% sustainably certified assortment (the Löfbergs brand).
  • 73% reduced climate impact (base year 2005).
  • 76% plant-based packaging material.
  • 72% renewable energy.
  • 105,000 small-scale coffee farmers in own development projects (base year 2001).
  • SEK 28 million in extra premiums for small-scale Fairtrade farmers and cooperatives.
  • Löfbergs is the first roaster in the world to join the platform Era of We, which democratises the value chain of coffee and let the farmers set the terms.
  • Löfbergs’s initiative Circular Coffee Community grows and more partners join.

Strengthens the coffee farmers

The climate change affects the world’s coffee farmers to a great extent. And fewer young people see a future in coffee. To strengthen the farmers and their possibilities of meeting climate change and improve their livelihoods is a prioritised matter to secure the future of coffee. This is where Löfbergs is making a lot of investments.

Within the framework of International Coffee Partners, Löfbergs is working together with seven other family-owned coffee companies to support small-scale coffee farmers and their families. The goal was to reach 100,000 farmers by 2023, but 105,000 coffee farmers have already participated in the projects, which many times have resulted in a multiplied income for the farmers.

As the first roaster in the world, Löfbergs joined Era of We, a digital platform that brings farmers, roasters, and consumers together. The purpose is to democratise the value chain and let the farmers set the terms. It will also be easier for the consumer to discover new unique coffee sorts and explore the history of their favourite coffee.

“Era of We makes it possible for coffee farmers to build their own brands and market themselves directly towards coffee roasters as well as consumers. When the farmers are in the driver’s seat, the value of their efforts increases, which creates better prerequisites for both farmers and consumers,” says Anders Fredriksson.

100% circular in sight

With the starting point of minimising the negative impact and maximise the positive, Löfbergs is making a lot of effort within the sustainability area at home too.

This year, Löfbergs started roasting coffee with 100% fossil-free LPG, which contributes to Löfbergs reducing its own climate impact with 73% since the base year of 2005. At the same time, the work of phasing out the fossil plastic in packaging continued. Today, 76% of all packaging material that Löfbergs uses is plant-based.

Another important effort is the circular transformation that Löfbergs drives. Löfbergs’s initiative Circular Coffee Community, which aims at making coffee to a 100% circular product, grew and attracted new partners, which Anders Fredriksson means is necessary to achieve progress.

“No matter how much we try, we cannot change the world on our own. It is about the power of doing things together. It is a prerequisite to be able to push on for a circular, fair and inclusive future,” says Anders Fredriksson.

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